Do You Really Want Your Doctor to be Creative?

Posted: July 13, 2015 in Clinical Practice, Medical School, Medicine
Tags: , , , ,
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Photo Credit: W Yuting, University of Oregon

If I were to ask you right now to list the most important qualities you want in a doctor, you would probably start with “Competent” and “Empathetic.” The first word out of your mouth would probably not be “Creative.” And yet, there is a growing trend in the medical literature and medical school curricula toward incorporation of the arts and humanities in physician training. Why?

Dr. Danielle Ofri, in her excellent article in the New York Times points out that creativity in medicine would not be unheard of: “Medicine is a field with a strong history of creativity, but its daily practice feels less and less so.” Creativity is tied to innovation and so should always be welcome if a field wishes to progress. But is getting medical students to read poetry and looking at paintings just a bunch of fluff? Not according to two well respected physicians at the University of Georgetown who offer this concrete example of how humanities sensibilities enhance medical clinical skills:

“Selected viewings of art with trained art historians,” in which medical students “learn context, practice description, and note emotion.” This could help to understand and identify “the different cultural and historical lenses through which images are filtered”—an important way to understand the assumptions they bring to their interpretation of a set of symptoms.”,

But what about at the day to day level, real patient, real person. What difference does it make when a doctor gets creative? Dr Ofri gives a  great example from Dr. Oliver Sacks in which a patient had Tourette’s syndrome with debilitating tics that were negatively affecting his home and professional life. He was prescribed Haldol, which eliminated the tics but also flattened his ability to improvise as a jazz drummer, one of his favorite activities. The non-creative doctor response would have been “You have to take the good with the bad”, as Ofri notes. But the creative doctor proposes “Take Haldol during the week so you can do your job, and hold at the weekends so you can play your drums like you used to.” The solution is not only creative but empathetic. And this is where I think the link is crucial. Because of how much I care about the entire health of my patient, my empathy fuels my creativity.

If there is one clear lesson I learned from my years in Theatre it is that people have many layers. Often, these layers contradict each other. I want to eat healthily, but have you tasted that burger or chocolate mousse? I want to give but I also want to take. I want to create but sometimes, I also want to destroy. Contradictions are part of who we are. That is why I think that Ofri proposes that computers can never effectively treat people:

“If all patients and their diseases presented in exactly the manner of the textbooks, then the algorithms would be sufficient . . . but the human condition is far messier — in health and even more so in illness.”

Anton Chekhov, a doctor, became one of Russia’s most celebrated playwrights precisely because of his fascination with human frailty or weakness, first physical and then psychological and emotional. He wrote characters who were compelling not because they were eloquent, morally outstanding or successful but because they were profoundly human, aspiring to be something greater even if they did not always succeed. The creative doctor is one who looks at this person first and the disease second.

That’s not easy. Using standard treatments and keeping on schedule in a pressurised healthcare environment is far more efficient. Stopping the world to “create” for your patient demands so much more from the doctor, often within a system that does not encourage it. And yet, if we are to stay true to the ideals of medicine, we must swim against the tide and be creative for our patients. Creativity is an act of empathy.

Do you want your doctor to be creative? I hope so.

Comments
  1. bhan says:

    Great post. I completely agree with you about creativity in medicine.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thank you bhan! I’m glad to see that you enjoyed the post and that you also value creativity in medicine. I think your future patients will be better for it . . .

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Poetic Liberty says:

    I sure would….

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Waithanjĩ says:

    He’d have to have an A+ rating, lol just as it is for the patient one has to have perfected the equilibrium of the illness in order to manage deviations from it as ironic as that may seem.

    Liked by 1 person

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